Tag: Knowledge community (Page 1 of 5)

Time Management Tips

Kate Sheppard is my idol for all things related to time management as an academic. Kate is still the model that we hold up in the History of Science department at OU for finishing on time as a grad student, and she’s even more impressive as a faculty member. She’s already published a monograph and a volume of edited correspondence along with numerous articles and was fast-tracked at Missouri S&T for tenure. She edits & contributes to LadyScience.com, and she’s on several committees for national organizations. She runs marathons. She has an adorable kid and husband. She’s just an all around bad-ass.

Here’s her advice for carving up time. I’m mostly writing this so I can have it as a note to remind myself how to be productive:

I’ve always like the Pomodoro technique, but I’m pretty bad at actually implementing it. The key, I think, is to plan out your day ahead of time and use the timer as a limit to how much time you have for each task. If you don’t get all of a task done in 30 minutes, that’s too bad, you need to move on to the next thing. This shifts the focus from, “I’ll work on this thing for a couple of hours,” to “I’ve got 30 minutes to add a couple of paragraphs to this document.” Brevity is the key to wit and production apparently.

After I read Kate’s tweets, I went ahead and mapped out my days for the rest of the week. I’m still using AirTables to keep track of my To-Do list and projects, but then I map those to-do items to 30 or 60 minute windows in my day. We’ll see how well this works over the relatively unstructured and chaotic summer. Hopefully, I’ll build a good enough routine that it’ll carry into the fall, and I can test it out within the chaos of faculty and student support.

Photograph of the staples holding Keegan's head together

Keegan’s Game Jam

This weekend, there is a 48 hour Game Jam in honor of Keegan Long-Wheeler. As most of you know, Keegan had to have brain surgery a couple of weeks ago to remove a tumor. In order to cheer him up, we wanted to encourage his friends to build games about Keegan, friendship, dealing with illness, or whatever else came to mind.

The Game Jam is a 48-hour window to build a game in Twine and post it to the site (by midnight on Sunday). There is a community forum to chat, ask for help, or share ideas. I would also like to see if we can find a time to meetup online next week to play games and talk.

Keegan and I have been teaching Twine as a game building platform for the last couple of years. We like Twine, because it’s very easy to pick up allowing us to focus our attention on creating interesting choose your own adventure stories. We built an open faculty development program called eXperiencePlay.education to teach faculty about storytelling in the classroom. The hope with this program is that even if faculty don’t embrace game play or gamification of their courses, they’ll rethink the narrative and student choice within the course. If you haven’t made a game before, I’d suggest going to the site and looking through the material there to help you think about game design and storytelling.  

After, we got started with building games, Keegan got in touch with Dan Cox. Dan is one of the leading figures in the Twine community having built numerous Twine tutorials and the Twine cookbook. Thanks to Dan, several of Keegan’s projects and tutorials have now been incorporated into the Twinery’s guides. When I wanted to set up a game jam for Keegan, I reached out to Dan and he put together this site on itch.io, guidelines for the Game Jam, and a set of resources to help everyone out.

So, if you’re a friend of Keegan (if you know me, you probably know and are a friend of Keegan), I hope you’ll join us for our game jam.

Code Ocean

Sarah Clayton in the libraries organized a demo for Code Ocean today. The company offers reproducibility as service allowing you to upload or import code and data in a variety of open source languages and run it on their servers. The most common use case would be someone publishing their code and data along-side a journal publication so that readers can test it for themselves.

Below are a couple of versions of their interface as embeds. I like how you can manipulate the code, run it, and see the results in situ. I’m particularly interested in how this might be used in place of a GitHub gist to teach both code and the various scientific and engineering concepts that the code facilitates.


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